English 3060 – Rhetoric, Writing, & American Culture Final Paper

English 3060 – Rhetoric, Writing, & American Culture Final Paper

English 3060 – Rhetoric, Writing, & American Culture Final Paper Assignment Sheet Requirements: Length: 1500-1800 words Formatting: Times New Roman 12 pt. font, 1-inch margins all around, double-spaced text Citation: All outside sources that you use, whether it’s to provide background information or evidence for something you want to say, should be properly cited in-text and at the end of the paper in a bibliography page. Use any citation style you are comfortable with (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.), as long as it is consistent and properly done. Check out the OWL at Purdue’s website for citation guidelines (see Resources below). How to submit: View the course schedule for all due dates/times and more information about how and where to submit materials. Overview: Your analysis mini-paper did not include a full-fledged introduction, background, or conclusion section—it was just an analysis of your artifacts. To write your final paper for this class, you will revise your Analysis Mini-Paper and frame it with 1. introductory and background sections and 2. a conclusion that clearly articulates the “so what” factor (why should anyone care about analyzing these artifacts?). You will likely need to do some research and information gathering in order to write this paper. Your Task: • Revise your artifact analysis mini-paper, based on the feedback I gave you in your conference. The revised analysis will become the majority of your final paper. • Do some research*, about your artifacts specifically, or about the topics covered in your artifacts. For example, if your artifacts are about mental health, research the specific mental health topic. If the artifacts are famous (like a presidential speech), then research what other people have already said about the artifacts, and respond to their ideas in your paper. Keep track of your sources of information so that you can cite them in-text and at the end of the paper. Not citing your sources is a form of plagiarism. Familiarize yourself with the university’s academic honesty policy. • Write an introduction and a background section for your final paper to precede the analysis. o In the introduction, your goal is to get your readers’ attention by telling them a little bit about your artifacts and what you’re going to talk about in your paper. Save extra information about the artifacts for the background section. Clearly state your argument at the end of the introduction. Your argument should answer the question: what you are trying to prove to readers in your analysis? o In the background section, you can provide more context about your artifact(s), such as information about the producer/creator, the intended and actual audiences, where/how these audiences engage with the artifact(s), and, if applicable, historical information. • Write a conclusion that leaves your readers contemplating all of the great points you discussed in your analysis and offers them a “so what”—why did they go through the trouble of reading your paper? Why does your analysis of these artifacts matter? How does it teach us something new and worthwhile? Organize the Paper Using These Headings: Introduction Background Analysis (this section is your revised mini-paper) The name of your first rhetorical concept/framework (e.g., visual framing) The name of your second rhetorical concept/framework (e.g., the three appeals) The name of your third rhetorical concept/framework (e.g., causal link and pragmatic arguments) Etc. (Continue for however many concepts as you use.) Conclusion Bibliography/Works Cited/References (title depends on what citation style you use) Resources to Help You: 1. The Writing Center has several excellent writing consultants who will talk to you about your project ideas and can help you before you even get started writing: http://wmich.edu/writingcenter 2. If you need help formatting your citations in your paper and/or in your bibliography, use the OWL at Purdue website: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html 3. *Examples of credible, reliable sources for your research (Do not use Wikipedia. There are lots of credible sources besides the ones here—these are just some options): o The Mayo Clinic, o The National Institutes of Health (NIH), o The American Psychological Association (APA), o The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), o The National Science Foundation (NSF), and o The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Instructions for Rough Draft The rough draft should be your best, first effort at producing a reader-friendly, well-organized, argument-driven paper. It must be 1500-1800 words long and encapsulate all of the components listed above, including a revised artifact analysis, to earn full credit. There will be a draft workshop, during which you will receive feedback from your classmates on your paper. The final paper, with all of its preliminary components, is worth 165 points toward your 300 total points for the course: Proposal: 15 points Analysis Mini-Paper: 50 points Full Rough Draft: 20 points Final Paper: 80 points Grading Rubric & Draft Workshop Instructions These will be posted in separate documents.